DAS TIERAUGE English

A Mutation in LTBP2 Causes Congenital Glaucoma in Domestic Cats (Felis catus)

18. Oktober 2016

Iowa – mechentel news – The glaucomas are a group of diseases characterized by optic nerve damage that together represent a leading cause of blindness in the human population and in domestic animals. Here we report a mutation in LTBP2 that causes primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) in domestic cats. We identified a spontaneous form of PCG in cats and established a breeding colony segregating for PCG consistent with

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Aerobic metabolism on muscle contraction in porcine iris sphincter.

18. Oktober 2016

Musashino/Tokio – mechentel news – Eyes are supplied O2 through the cornea and vessels of the retina and iris, which are tissues characterized by aerobic metabolism. Meanwhile, there are no reports on the association between iris sphincter contraction and aerobic metabolism. In this paper, we studied the aforementioned association. Eyes from adult pigs of either sex were obtained from a local abattoir. A muscle strip was connected

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Ocular Penetration and Pharmacokinetics of Ripasudil Following Topical Administration to Rabbits.

18. Oktober 2016

Higashimurayama/Tokio – mechentel news – We evaluated the ocular pharmacokinetics of ripasudil (K-115), a selective Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, following topical administration to rabbits. We determined the ocular distribution of [(14)C]ripasudil by whole-head autoradiography and the radioactivity of each ocular tissue after single and multiple instillation of [(14)C]ripasudil to pigmented rabbits. We also measured the aqueous humor concentrations after concomitant instillation of ripasudil and a combination agent (0.005% latanoprost and 0.5%

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Efficacy of moxidectin 2.5% and imidacloprid 10% in the treatment of ocular thelaziosis by Thelazia callipaedain naturally infected dogs.

18. Oktober 2016

Valenzano/Leverkusen – mechentel news – Thelazia callipaeda (Spirurida, Thelaziidae) has been documented as agent of ocular infection in domestic animals (dogs and cats), wildlife (e.g., foxes, hares, rabbits), and humans. In the last two decades, this parasitosis has been increasingly reported in several European countries. Both adult and larval stages of the eyeworm are responsible for symptoms ranging from mild

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